Lively, friendly Copenhagen offers plenty to see and do, from historic royal sites to stunning modern design and architecture. Copenhagen is one large attraction in itself, as many of the cobblestone streets and rows of old Danish houses are much like they have been for centuries. Yet Copenhagen is adding ever more modern attractions to the heap of historic ones.
Denmark's capital is a fascinating city full of contrast and surprise.

 

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Lively, friendly Copenhagen offers plenty to see and do, from historic royal sites to stunning modern design and architecture. Or how about a test-drive in an electrical vehicle? Denmark's capital is a fascinating city full of contrast and surprise.
Copenhagen is one large attraction in itself, as many of the cobblestone streets and rows of old Danish houses are much like they have been for centuries. Yet Copenhagen is adding ever more modern attractions to the heap of historic ones.

By 2025, Copenhagen is aiming to become the world’s first carbon-neutral capital, which is why sustainable transport is crucial to the city, and at Better Place you can book a test-drive in an electric car.

More than 60 museums all tell their own story about the land, the city and its people. Each story different and none complete. If you should venture to try to see them all, there is a special ticket which allows you to see as many as possible in one, two or three days. Some museums also have special days when no admission is charged.

When the royal family is in residence at Amalienborg Castle it is a popular tourist sight to see the changing of the guard which takes place at noon. You can tell if they are in residence because a swallowtail flag flies on the mast when the queen is residing in Copenhagen, rather than in her North Zealand summer home, Fredensborg Palace.

A walk along picturesque Nyhavn Canal dating from 1673, when it was built to connect the inner city to the sea, reveals the best of historic Copenhagen with old but well-preserved architecture and wooden boats showcasing the city's maritime history. The famous fairy-tale writer Hans Christian Andersen lived in no. 20, from 1834-38, where he wrote his first stories.

Within Denmark’s capital exists another world called Christiania. It’s a small area within the city that proclaimed its independence from the state in 1971, and an intriguing place to visit and experience dominated largely by a freethinking 'hippy' culture. Visitors can enjoy the neighbourhood's peaceful green environment and its magical combination of village and metropolitan life.

In Copenhagen you are never far from the water and great architecture. Water, space and light are the key elements of the recent architectural boom in Copenhagen. So take a stroll on the waterfront and see the sights – a library, a royal play house and the Opera are among the sights you can experience.